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Use Caution When Adding Breads to Your Diet

Use Caution When Adding Breads to Your Diet
4 Nov 19

Use Caution When Adding Breads to Your Diet


Breads are one of the most common food products, if not the most common, there is on the planet today. Almost any country and civilization in the world has a staple bread variant, and it’s not hard to see why. Breads are easy to make, their ingredients are readily available, and they are just so delicious. But there are things we don’t know about bread that might turn out to be unhealthy for us after all.

What are the Ingredients Inside Bread?

No matter the origin, bread essentially contains flour, salt, sugar, and eggs. By itself, breads are actually not something you should be afraid of. They’ve become the world’s staple food for a reason. They are a fantastic source of energy for the resources it requires to be done. Simply put, they’re cheap and they’re fulfilling. You can’t go wrong with that, right?

Not Exactly.

Unless you make your own bread, you’re most likely to buy them from your local supermarket. Loaves upon loaves of bread are available in bakeries and grocery stores across the country – and it’s these kinds of bread you should avoid.

A quick look at the nutrition labels for commonly available white bread loaves reveals they contain high sugar levels. A further study conducted by the Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, and Exercise in Sydney, Australia revealed that breads ranked among the highest in terms of glycemic index. True enough, the study showed that white breads had a glycemic index of 70-75.

The Glycemic Index

Glycemic index is the measure of how the carbohydrates in food can readily increase a person’s blood sugar levels. The standard number for this is 100, the measure for pure glucose sugar. Needless to say, a lower index means a lower sugar content.

Therefore, if commercially available white and wheat breads have a glycemic index of 70-75, then they may not be good for you. Included in that study was the glycemic index for dark chocolate, which was at 40. If a food has almost double the ability of chocolate to increase a person’s blood sugar levels, then perhaps its best to avoid that food altogether.


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